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You are here: HomeAbout the USPSTFReports to CongressFirst Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services - Appendix C

First Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services - Appendix C

Appendix C. Complete Listing of
All USPSTF Specific Recommendations as of September 2011

Grade Title
A Aspirin to Prevent Myocardial Infarction: Men Ages 45 to 79 Years
The USPSTF recommends the use of aspirin for men ages 45 to 79 years when the potential benefit of a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage.
A Aspirin to Prevent Ischemic Stroke: Women Ages 55 to 79 Years
The USPSTF recommends the use of aspirin for women ages 55 to 79 years when the potential benefit of a reduction in ischemic strokes outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage.
A Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: Screening in Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria with urine culture in pregnant women at 12 to 16 weeks' gestation or at the first prenatal visit, if later.
A Cervical Cancer: Screening in Women Who Are Sexually Active
The USPSTF recommends screening for cervical cancer in women who have been sexually active and have a cervix.
A Chlamydia: Screening in Women Ages 24 Years and Younger or Older Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydial infection in all sexually active, nonpregnant women ages 24 years and younger and in older nonpregnant women who are at increased risk.
A Colorectal Cancer: Screening in Adults Ages 50 to 75 Years
The USPSTF recommends screening for colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy in adults, beginning at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years. The risks and benefits of these screening methods vary.
A Congenital Hypothyroidism: Screening in Newborns
The USPSTF recommends screening for congenital hypothyroidism in newborns.
A Folic Acid: Supplementation in Women Planning or Capable of Pregnancy
The USPSTF recommends that all women planning or capable of pregnancy take a daily supplement containing 0.4 to 0.8 mg (400 to 800 µg) of folic acid.
A Gonorrhea: Preventive Medication in Newborns
The USPSTF recommends prophylactic ocular topical medication for all newborns to prevent gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum.
A HIV: Screening in Adults and Adolescents at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for HIV in all adolescents and adults at increased risk for HIV infection.
A HIV: Screening in Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for HIV in all pregnant women.
A Hepatitis B Virus: Screening in Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus infection in all pregnant women at their first prenatal visit.
A High Blood Pressure: Screening in Adults Ages 18 Years and Older
The USPSTF recommends screening for high blood pressure in adults ages 18 years and older.
A Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Men Ages 35 Years and Older
The USPSTF recommends screening for lipid disorders in men ages 35 years and older.
A Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Women Ages 45 Years and Older at Increased Risk for Coronary Heart Disease
The USPSTF recommends screening for lipid disorders in women ages 45 years and older if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.
A Phenylketonuria: Screening in Newborns
The USPSTF recommends screening for phenylketonuria in newborns.
A Rh(D) Blood Typing: Screening in Pregnant Women at First Pregnancy-Related Visit
The USPSTF recommends Rh(D) blood typing and antibody testing for all pregnant women during their first visit for pregnancy-related care.
A Sickle Cell Disease: Screening in Newborns
The USPSTF recommends screening for sickle cell disease in newborns.
A Syphilis: Screening in Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for syphilis infection in all pregnant women.
A Syphilis: Screening in Adults at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for syphilis infection in adults at increased risk.
A Tobacco Use: Counseling and Interventions for Adults
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians ask all adults about tobacco use and provide tobacco cessation interventions for those who use tobacco products.
A Tobacco Use: Counseling and Interventions for Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians ask all pregnant women about tobacco use and provide augmented, pregnancy-tailored counseling for those who smoke.
B Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening in Men Ages 65 to 75 Years Who Smoke
The USPSTF recommends one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm by ultrasonography in men ages 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked.
B Alcohol Misuse: Screening and Behavioral Counseling for Adults and Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends screening and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce alcohol misuse by adults, including pregnant women, in primary care settings.
B BRCA Mutation Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends that women whose family history is associated with an increased risk for deleterious mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 or BRCA2 be referred for genetic counseling and evaluation for BRCA testing.
B Breast Cancer: Preventive Medication Discussion With Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians discuss chemoprevention with women at high risk for breast cancer and at low risk for adverse effects of chemoprevention. Clinicians should inform patients of the potential benefits and harms of chemoprevention.
B Breast Cancer: Screening With Mammography in Women Ages 50 to 74 Years*
The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women ages 50 to 74 years.

 *The Department of Health and Human Services, in implementing the Affordable Care Act under the standard it sets out in revised Section 2713(a)(5) of the Public Health Service Act, utilizes the 2002 USPSTF recommendation on breast cancer screening. This recommendation states, "The USPSTF recommends screening mammography, with or without clinical breast examination (CBE), every 1-2 years for women ages 40 and older (B recommendation)."

B Breastfeeding: Primary Care Interventions to Promote Its Use in All Pregnant Women and New Mothers
The USPSTF recommends interventions during pregnancy and after birth to promote and support breastfeeding.
B Chlamydia: Screening in Pregnant Women Ages 24 Years and Younger or Older Pregnant Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydial infection in all pregnant women ages 24 years and younger and in older pregnant women who are at increased risk.
B Dental Caries: Oral Fluoride Supplementation in Preschool Children Ages 6 Months and Older
The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians prescribe oral fluoride supplementation at currently recommended doses to preschool children ages 6 months and older whose primary water source is deficient in fluoride.
B Depression: Screening in Adolescents Ages 12 to 18 Years in Clinical Practices With Systems of Care
The USPSTF recommends screening for major depressive disorder in adolescents (ages 12-18 years) when systems are in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal), and followup.
B Depression: Screening in Adults When Staff-Assisted Depression Care Supports Are in Place
The USPSTF recommends screening for depression in adults (ages 18 years and older) when staff-assisted depression care supports are in place to assure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and followup.
B Gonorrhea: Screening in Pregnant Women and Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for gonorrhea infection in all sexually active women, including those who are pregnant, if they are at increased risk for infection (that is, if they are young or have other individual or population risk factors; go to Clinical Considerations section for further discussion of risk factors).
B Healthy Diet: Counseling for Adults With Hyperlipidemia and Other Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease
The USPSTF recommends intensive behavioral dietary counseling for adults with hyperlipidemia and other known risk factors for cardiovascular and diet-related chronic disease. Intensive counseling can be delivered by primary care clinicians or by referral to other specialists, such as nutritionists or dietitians.
B Hearing Loss in Newborns: Universal Screening in Newborns
The USPSTF recommends screening for hearing loss in all newborn infants.
B Iron Deficiency Anemia: Iron Supplementation in Asymptomatic Children Ages 6 to 12 Months at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends routine iron supplementation for asymptomatic children ages 6 to 12 months who are at increased risk for iron deficiency anemia.
B Iron Deficiency Anemia: Screening in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends routine screening for iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic pregnant women.
B Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Men Ages 20 to 34 Years at Increased Risk for Coronary Heart Disease
The USPSTF recommends screening for lipid disorders in men ages 20 to 35 years if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.
B Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Women Ages 20 to 44 Years at Increased Risk for Coronary Heart Disease
The USPSTF recommends screening for lipid disorders in women ages 20 to 45 years if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.
B Obesity: Screening in Children and Adolescents Ages 6 to 17 Years
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for obesity in children ages 6 years and older and offer them or refer them to comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions to promote improvement in weight status.
B Obesity: Screening and Intensive Counseling for Obese Adults
The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for obesity in all adults and offer intensive counseling and behavioral interventions to promote sustained weight loss for obese adults.
B Osteoporosis: Screening in Women Ages 65 Years and Older and Younger Women at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends screening for osteoporosis in women ages 65 years or older and in younger women whose fracture risk is equal to or greater than that of a 65-year-old white woman who has no additional risk factors.
B RhD Blood Typing: Antibody Testing in Unsensitized RhD-Negative Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends repeated RhD antibody testing for all unsensitized RhD-negative women at 24-28 weeks gestation, unless the biological father is known to be RhD-negative.
B Sexually Transmitted Infections: Behavioral Counseling for Sexually Active Adolescents and Adults at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends high-intensity behavioral counseling to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) for all sexually active adolescents and for adults at increased risk for STIs.
B Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Screening in Adults With Sustained Blood Pressure of 135/80+
The USPSTF recommends screening for type 2 diabetes in asymptomatic adults with sustained blood pressure (either treated or untreated) greater than 135/80 mm Hg.
B Visual Impairment: Screening in All Children at Least Once Between Ages of 3 and 5 Years
The USPSTF recommends screening for vision impairment in all children at least once between the ages of 3 and 5 years, to detect the presence of amblyopia or its risk factors.
C Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening in Men Ages 65 to 75 Years Who Do Not Smoke
The USPSTF makes no recommendation for or against screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men ages 65 to 75 years who have never smoked.
C Breast Cancer: Screening with Mammography in Women Ages 40 to 49 Years*
The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take patient context into account, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms.

 *The Department of Health and Human Services, in implementing the Affordable Care Act under the standard it sets out in revised Section 2713(a)(5) of the Public Health Service Act, utilizes the 2002 USPSTF recommendation on breast cancer screening. This recommendation states, "The USPSTF recommends screening mammography, with or without clinical breast examination (CBE), every 1-2 years for women ages 40 and older (B recommendation)."

C Chlamydia: Screening in Women Ages 25 Years and Older Not at Increased Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for chlamydial infection in women ages 25 years and older, whether or not they are pregnant, if they are not at increased risk.
C Colorectal Cancer: Screening in Adults Ages 76 to 85 Years
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for colorectal cancer in adults ages 76 to 85 years. There may be considerations that support colorectal cancer screening in an individual patient.
C Depression: Screening in Adults When Staff-Assisted Depression Care Supports Are Not in Place
The USPTF recommends against routine screening for depression in adults (ages 18 years and older) when staff-assisted depression care supports are not in place. There may be considerations that support screening for depression in an individual patient.
C HIV: Screening in Adults and Adolescents Not at Increased Risk
The USPSTF makes no recommendation for or against routine screening for HIV in adolescents and adults who are not at increased risk for HIV infection.
C Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Men Ages 20 to 35 Years Not at Increased Risk for Coronary Heart Disease
The USPSTF makes no recommendation for or against routine screening for lipid disorders in men ages 20 to 35 years who are not at increased risk for coronary heart disease.
C Lipid Disorders in Adults: Screening in Women Ages 20 Years and Older Not at Increased Risk for Coronary Heart Disease
The USPSTF makes no recommendation for or against routine screening for lipid disorders in women ages 20 years and older who are not at increased risk for coronary heart disease.
D Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening in Women
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women.
D Aspirin to Prevent Myocardial Infarction: Men Younger Than Age 45 Years
The USPSTF recommends against the use of aspirin for myocardial infarction prevention in men younger than age 45 years.
D Aspirin to Prevent Ischemic Stroke: Women Younger Than Age 55 Years
The USPSTF recommends against the use of aspirin for stroke prevention in women younger than age 55 years.
D Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: Screening in Men and Nonpregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends against screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in men and nonpregnant women.
D BRCA Mutation Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Women at Low Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine referral for genetic counseling or routine breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) testing for women whose family history is not associated with an increased risk for deleterious mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2.
D Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Screening in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women at Low Risk for Preterm Delivery
The USPSTF recommends against screening for bacterial vaginosis in asymptomatic pregnant women at low risk for preterm delivery.
D Blood Lead Levels: Screening in Children Ages 1 to 5 Years at Average Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children ages 1 to 5 years who are at average risk.
D Blood Lead Levels: Screening in Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic pregnant women.
D Breast Cancer: Preventive Medication for Women at Average Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine use of tamoxifen or raloxifene for the primary prevention of breast cancer in women at low or average risk for breast cancer.
D Breast Cancer: Teaching Breast Self-Examination*
The USPSTF recommends against teaching breast self-examination.

 *The Department of Health and Human Services, in implementing the Affordable Care Act under the standard it sets out in revised Section 2713(a)(5) of the Public Health Service Act, utilizes the 2002 USPSTF recommendation on breast cancer screening. This recommendation states, "The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against teaching or performing routine breast self-examination (I statement)."

D Coronary Heart Disease: Screening Using ECG, ETT, or EBCT in Adults at Low Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening with resting electrocardiography, exercise treadmill test, or electron-beam computerized tomography scanning for coronary calcium for either the presence of severe coronary artery stenosis or the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in adults at low risk for CHD events.
D Carotid Artery Stenosis: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF recommends against screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general adult population.
D Cervical Cancer: Screening in Women Older Than Age 65 Years at Average Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for cervical cancer in women older than age 65 years if they have had adequate recent screening with normal Pap smears and are not otherwise at high risk for cervical cancer.
D Cervical Cancer: Screening in Women Who Have Had a Hysterectomy
The USPSTF recommends against routine Pap smear screening in women who have had a total hysterectomy for benign disease.
D Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Screening Using Spirometry in Adults
The USPSTF recommends against screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using spirometry in adults.
D Colorectal Cancer: Screening in Adults Older Than Age 85 Years
The USPSTF recommends against screening for colorectal cancer in adults older than age 85 years.
D Genital Herpes: Screening in Asymptomatic Adolescents and Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine serological screening for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in asymptomatic adolescents and adults.
D Genital Herpes: Screening in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women
The USPSTF recommends against routine serological screening for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in asymptomatic pregnant women at any time during pregnancy to prevent neonatal HSV infection.
D Gonorrhea: Screening in Adults at Low Risk
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for gonorrhea infection in adults who are at low risk for infection.
D Hormone Replacement Therapy: Preventive Medication for Postmenopausal Women
The USPSTF recommends against the routine use of combined estrogen and progestin for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women.
D Hormone Replacement Therapy: Preventive Medication for Postmenopausal Women Who Have Had a Hysterectomy
The USPSTF recommends against the routine use of unopposed estrogen for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy.
D Hemochromatosis: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine genetic screening for hereditary hemochromatosis in the asymptomatic general population.
D Hepatitis B: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for chronic hepatitis B virus infection in the asymptomatic general population.
D Hepatitis C: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for hepatitis C virus infection in the asymptomatic general population.
D Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening in Asymptomatic Adolescents
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for idiopathic scoliosis in asymptomatic adolescents.
D Ovarian Cancer: Screening in Women
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for ovarian cancer.
D Pancreatic Cancer: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for pancreatic cancer using abdominal palpation, ultrasonography, or serologic markers in asymptomatic adults.
D Peripheral Arterial Disease: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for peripheral arterial disease.
D Prostate Cancer: Screening in Men Ages 75 Years or Older
The USPSTF recommends against screening for prostate cancer in men ages 75 years or older.
D Routine Aspirin or NSAID Use for the Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Medication for Adults at Average Risk
The USPSTF recommends against the routine use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to prevent colorectal cancer in adults at average risk for colorectal cancer.
D Syphilis: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for syphilis infection in asymptomatic adults who are not at increased risk for syphilis infection.
D Testicular Cancer: Screening in Adolescents and Men
The USPSTF recommends against screening for testicular cancer in adolescents or adults.
D Vitamin Supplementation to Prevent Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease: Beta Carotene
The USPSTF recommends against the use of beta-carotene supplements, either alone or in combination, for the prevention of cancer or cardiovascular disease.
I Alcohol Misuse: Screening and Behavioral Counseling for Adolescents
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against screening and behavioral counseling interventions to prevent or reduce alcohol misuse by adolescents in primary care settings.
I Aspirin to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease: Adults Ages 80 Years or Older
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease in adults ages 80 years or older.
I Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Screening in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women at High Risk For Preterm Delivery
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for bacterial vaginosis in asymptomatic pregnant women at high risk for preterm delivery.
I Bladder Cancer: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for bladder cancer in asymptomatic adults.
I Blood Lead Levels: Screening in Children Ages 1 to 5 Years at Increased Risk
The USPSTF concludes that evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children ages 1 to 5 years who are at increased risk.
I Breast Cancer: Screening Using Clinical Breast Examination and Mammography in Women Ages 40 Years and Older*
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination beyond screening mammography in women ages 40 years or older.

 *The Department of Health and Human Services, in implementing the Affordable Care Act under the standard it sets out in revised Section 2713(a)(5) of the Public Health Service Act, utilizes the 2002 USPSTF recommendation on breast cancer screening. This recommendation states, "The USPSTF recommends screening mammography, with or without clinical breast examination (CBE), every 1-2 years for women ages 40 and older (B recommendation)."

I Breast Cancer: Screening Using Digital Mammography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging Instead of Film Mammography
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer.
I Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Assessment Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the nontraditional risk factors to screen asymptomatic adults with no history of coronary heart disease (CHD) to prevent CHD events. The nontraditional risk factors included in this recommendation are high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, ankle-brachial index, leukocyte count, fasting blood glucose level, periodontal disease, carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcification score on electron-beam computed tomography, homocysteine level, and lipoprotein(a) level.
I Coronary Heart Disease: Screening Using ECG, ETT, or EBCT in Adults at Increased Risk
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening with resting electrocardiography, exercise treadmill test, or electron-beam computerized tomography scanning for coronary calcium for either the presence of severe coronary artery stenosis or the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in adults at increased risk for CHD events.
I Cervical Cancer: Screening Using Human Papillomavirus Testing
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the routine use of human papillomavirus testing as a primary screening test for cervical cancer.
I Cervical Cancer: Screening Using New Technologies
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the routine use of new technologies to screen for cervical cancer.
I Chlamydia: Screening in Men
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydial infection in men.
I Colorectal Cancer: Screening Using Computed Tomographic Colonography and Fecal DNA Testing
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of computed tomographic colonography and fecal DNA testing as screening modalities for colorectal cancer.
I Dementia: Screening in Older Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for dementia in older adults.
I Dental Caries: Routine Risk Assessment in Preschool Children Older Than Age 6 Months
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine risk assessment by primary care clinicians in preschool children for the prevention of dental disease.
I Depression: Screening in Children Ages 7 to 11 Years
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for depression in children ages 7 to 11 years.
I Drug Use: Screening in Adolescents, Adults, and Pregnant Women
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for illicit drug use in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women.
I Family and Intimate Partner Violence: Screening
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening of parents or guardians for the physical abuse or neglect of children, of women for intimate partner violence, or of older adults or their caregivers for elder abuse.
I Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Screening in Pregnant Women Before or After 24 Weeks Gestation
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women either before or after 24 weeks gestation.
I Glaucoma: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against screening for glaucoma in adults.
I Gonorrhea: Screening in Men at Increased Risk
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for gonorrhea infection in men at increased risk for infection.
I Gonorrhea: Screening in Pregnant Women Not at Risk
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for gonorrhea infection in pregnant women who are not at increased risk for infection.
I Healthy Diet: Counseling for Unselected Patients in a Primary Care Setting
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine behavioral counseling to promote a healthy diet in unselected patients in primary care settings.
I Hepatitis C: Screening in Adults at Increased Risk
The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for hepatitis C infection in adults at high risk for infection.
I Hip Dysplasia: Screening in Infants
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend routine screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants as a means to prevent adverse outcomes.
I Hyperbilirubinemia: Screening in Infants to Prevent Chronic Bilirubin Encephalopathy
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend screening for hyperbilirubinemia in infants to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy.
I Iron Deficiency Anemia: Iron Supplementation in Asymptomatic Children Ages 6 to 12 Months at Average Risk
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine iron supplementation in asymptomatic children ages 6 to 12 months who are at average risk for iron deficiency anemia.
I Iron Deficiency Anemia: Iron Supplementation in Nonanemic Pregnant Women
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine iron supplementation in nonanemic pregnant women.
I Iron Deficiency Anemia: Screening in Asymptomatic Children Ages 6 to 12 Months
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic children ages 6 to 12 months.
I Lipid Disorders: Screening in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Ages 1 to 20 Years
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for lipid disorders in infants, children, adolescents, or young adults (up to age 20 years).
I Low Back Pain: Counseling for Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the routine use of interventions to prevent low back pain in adults in primary care settings.
I Lung Cancer: Screening in Asymptomatic Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against screening for lung cancer in asymptomatic adults with low-dose computerized tomography, chest x-ray, sputum cytology, or a combination of these tests.
I Obesity: Screening and Counseling of Any Intensity in Overweight Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the use of counseling of any intensity and behavioral interventions to promote sustained weight loss in overweight adults.
I Oral Cancer: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routinely screening for oral cancer in adults.
I Osteoporosis: Screening in Men
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for osteoporosis in men.
I Physical Activity: Behavioral Counseling in a Primary Care Setting
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against behavioral counseling in primary care settings to promote physical activity.
I Prevention of Motor Vehicle Occupant Injuries: Counseling in a Primary Care Setting for Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine counseling of all patients in the primary care setting to reduce driving while under the influence of alcohol or riding with drivers who are alcohol-impaired.
I Prevention of Motor Vehicle Occupant Injuries: Counseling in a Primary Care Setting for Proper Use of Motor Vehicle Restraints
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the incremental benefit, beyond the efficacy of legislation and community-based interventions, of counseling in the primary care setting to improve proper use of motor vehicle occupant restraints (child safety seats, booster seats, and lap-and-shoulder belts).
I Prostate Cancer: Screening in Men Younger Than Age 75 Years
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer in men younger than age 75 years.
I Sexually Transmitted Infections: Behavioral Counseling for Adolescents and Adults Who Are Not Sexually Active or at Increased Risk
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of behavioral counseling to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents who are not sexually active and in adults not at increased risk for STIs.
I Skin Cancer: Counseling by Primary Care Physicians
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine counseling by primary care clinicians to prevent skin cancer.
I Skin Cancer: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using a whole-body skin examination by a primary care clinician or patient skin self-examination for the early detection of cutaneous melanoma, basal cell cancer, or squamous cell skin cancer in the adult general population.
I Speech and Language Delay: Screening in Preschool Children Using Brief, Formal Instruments
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the routine use of brief, formal screening instruments in primary care to detect speech and language delay in children ages 5 years and younger.
I Suicide Risk: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening by primary care clinicians to detect suicide risk in the general population.
I Thyroid Disease: Screening in Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for thyroid disease in adults.
I Tobacco Use: Screening and Counseling for Children and Adolescents
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine screening for tobacco use or interventions to prevent and treat tobacco use and dependence among children or adolescents.
I Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Screening in Adults with Blood Pressure of 135/80 or Lower
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for type 2 diabetes in asymptomatic adults with blood pressure of 135/80 mm Hg or lower.
I Visual Acuity: Screening in Older Adults
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for visual acuity in older adults.
I Visual Impairment: Screening in Children Younger Than Age 3 Years
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for vision impairment in children younger than age 3 years.
I Vitamin Supplementation to Prevent Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease: Vitamins A, C, E, and Multivitamins
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against the use of supplements of vitamins A, C, or E; multivitamins with folic acid; or antioxidant combinations for the prevention of cancer or cardiovascular disease.

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Current as of: December 2011

Internet Citation: First Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services - Appendix C. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. December 2013.
https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/first-annual-report-to-congress-on-high-priority-evidence-gaps-for-clinical-preventive-services---appendix-c

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