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Breast Cancer: Screening

Release Date: November 2009

This topic is in the process of being updated. Please go to the Update in Progress section to see the latest documents available.

Recommendation Summary

Summary of Recommendations

PopulationRecommendationGrade
(What's This?)
Women, Age 50-74 Years

The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women 50-74 years.

The USPSTF recommends the service. There is high certainty that the net benefit is moderate or there is moderate certainty that the net benefit is moderate to substantial.
Women, Before the Age of 50 Years

The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take patient context into account, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms. 

The USPSTF recommends against routinely providing the service. There may be considerations that support providing the service in an individual patient. There is at least moderate certainty that the net benefit is small.
Women, 75 Years and Older

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of screening mammography in women 75 years and older.

Go to the Clinical Considerations section for information on risk assessment and suggestions for practice regarding the I statement.

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of the service. Evidence is lacking, of poor quality, or conflicting, and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined.
All Women

The USPSTF recommends against teaching breast self-examination (BSE). 

The USPSTF recommends against the service. There is moderate or high certainty that the service has no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits
Women, 40 Years and Older

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination (CBE) beyond screening mammography in women 40 years or older.

Go to the Clinical Considerations section for information on risk assessment and suggestions for practice regarding the I statement.

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of the service. Evidence is lacking, of poor quality, or conflicting, and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined.
All Women

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer.

Go to the Clinical Considerations section for information on risk assessment and suggestions for practice regarding the I statement.

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of the service. Evidence is lacking, of poor quality, or conflicting, and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined.

On December 4, 2009, the USPSTF unanimously voted to update the language of their recommendation regarding women under 50 years of age to clarify their original and continued intent. 

 

Clinical Summary

Clinical summaries are one-page documents that provide guidance to primary care clinicians for using recommendations in practice.

This summary is intended for use by primary care clinicians.

 
Current as of: September 2013

Internet Citation: Recommendation Summary. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. September 2014.
http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Topic/recommendation-summary/breast-cancer-screening

USPSTF Program Office   540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850