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References

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Notes

Author Affiliations

aDr. Ockene: Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
bDr. Edgarton: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD
cDr. Teutsch: Outcomes Research and Management, Merck & Co., Inc., West Point, PA
dDr. Marion: School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA
eDrs. Miller and Genevro: Center for Primary Care, Prevention & Clinical Partnerships, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, Rockville, MD
fDr. Loveland-Cherry: The University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI
gDr. Fielding: Health Services and Pediatrics, UCLA School of Public Health, Department of Health Services, Los Angeles, CA
hDr. Briss: Community Guide Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

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Copyright and Source Information

This document is in the public domain within the United States.

Requests for linking or to incorporate content in electronic resources should be sent to: randie.siegel@ahrq.hhs.gov.

Source: Ockene JK, Edgerton EA, Teutsch SM, Marion LN, Miller T, Genevro JL, Loveland-Cherry CJ, Fielding JE, Briss PA. Integrating evidence-based clinical and community strategies to improve health. Am J Prev Med 2007;32:244-252.

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Current as of May 2007


Internet Citation:

Ockene JK, Edgerton EA, Teutsch SM, Marion LN, Miller T, Genevro JL, Loveland-Cherry CJ, Fielding JE, Briss PA. Integrating Evidence-Based Clinical and Community Strategies to Improve Health. Originally published in Am J Prev Med 2007;32:244-252. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf07/methods/tfmethods.htm


 


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