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Acknowledgments

This work was produced by the Oregon Health & Science University Evidence-based Practice Center under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Contract No. 290-97-0018) Rockville, MD. The authors gratefully acknowledge early manuscript review and suggestions by outside experts: Sue Curry, Ph.D.; Russ Glasgow, Ph.D.; Michael Goldstein, M.D.; and Pat Mullen, Dr.P.H.; as well as the support and critical review by other members of the work group (Karen Eden, Ph.D.; Mark Helfand, M.D., M.P.H.; Peter Briss, M.D.; Judith Harris, B.S.N.; Russell Harris, M.D., M.P.H.; Al Berg, M.D., M.P.H.; Mary Burdick, Ph.D.); the UNC and Oregon EPCs (Kathleen Lohr, Ph.D. and Gary Miranda, M.A.); the USPSTF (Steve Woolf, M.D., M.P.H. and Paul Frame, M.D.); and AHRQ (David Atkins, M.D., M.P.H.).

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Author Affiliations

a Whitlock: Oregon Health & Science University Evidence-based Practice Center, Kaiser Permanente/CHR.
b Orleans: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
c Pender: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
d Allan: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Copyright and Source Information

This document is in the public domain within the United States. Requests for linking or to incorporate content in electronic resources should be sent via the USPSTF contact form.

Source: Whitlock EP, Orleans T, Pender N, Allan J. Evaluating Primary Care Behavioral Counseling Interventions: An Evidence-based Approach. Am J Prev Med 2002;22(4):267-84.

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Evaluating Primary Care Behavioral Counseling Interventions: An Evidence-based Approach. Background Article. Originally in Am J Prev Med 2002;22(4):267-84. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/3rduspstf/behavior/behsum1.htm


 


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